Agricultural organizations support New Brunswick Craft Alcohol Producers

Posted: Nov 19, 2020

Agricultural organizations support New Brunswick Craft Alcohol Producers

The National Farmers Union in New Brunswick (NFU-NB), the Agricultural Alliance of New Brunswick, and Really Local Harvest ask the government and Alcool New Brunswick Liquor (ANBL) to rescind recent changes to the distribution system, introduction of profitability levels and the registration process.  

These changes will directly impact and harm local producers and farmers. The growing craft alcohol industry in New Brunswick creates employment, revitalizes local economies and supports NB agriculture. Currently in the province there are 57 brewers, 12 cideries, 18 cottage wineries and 16 distillers. The transformation of grain, fruit and vegetables, hops and other ingredients into alcohol is an important process to the food system, and these 103 craft alcohol businesses directly support NB farms. Craft alcohol producers find that using NB produce not only increases the quality of their products but also helps fight climate change by reducing transportation emissions of imports. 

Again we find that government policy directly contradicts previous statements of intention to increase fruit and vegetable production and increase self-sufficiency in the province. Farmers, producers, and processors have already had an incredibly difficult year in managing to cope and turn a profit with both COVID-19 and a drought. The provincial government needs to step up to the plate and support NB farms and industry, instead of limiting how they can sell their products, raising costs, and making it harder for them to compete. 

If Premiere Higgs wants to support NB farmers and increase fruit and vegetable production, then policies affecting the growth of local producers and processors need to be reconsidered. We request discussion on long term solutions and planning for NB industry, farms, small business, the environment, and how they intersect. “These kind of regulations are a clear attack on our rural areas, food sovereignty and autonomy. We can’t loose any local small and medium scale businesses, they are leaders in their community related to employment and local grassroots economy” says Pierre-Olivier Brassard, NFU-NB Board Member and co-operator of La Ferme Terre Partagée.

Really Local Harvest created the Eating Heritage, a food tourism symposium to support local farmers, alcohol producers, fishers, restaurants, and chefs network and collaborate. The National Farmers Union in New Brunswick and the Agricultural Alliance of New Brunswick are the only accredited farm organizations in the province. These three organizations work together on issues that affect all New Brunswick farms and our food system.

Media Contacts: 

French: Pierre-Olivier Brassard, 506-252-5092

English: Maxime Gauvin, 506-317-0321